Inportant Information

Contact us

  • address Dovedale Road, Bolton BL2 5HT
  • phone44 (0)7825 889734
  • emailinfo@ordit.co

Booking your test

The Part 3 is the last of 3 tests you have to pass to qualify as an Approved Driving Instructor. It’s a test of your ability to teach pupils.

You can book your approved driving instructor (ADI) part 3 test when you’ve passed your ADI part 2 test.

The ADI part 3 test works differently in Northern Ireland.

The national standard for driver and rider training tells you everything you must be able to do to pass the test.

You can find driving instructor training if you need help to prepare for the test.

Change or check your test details

You can change the date of your test after you’ve booked.

You can check the details if you’ve lost the email confirmation you were sent when you booked your test.

Rebook your test

Rebook your ADI part 3 test if you failed your first or second attempt at the test and want to resit it.

If you chose the extra training option (option 2) when you applied for your trainee licence, you must do 5 hours of extra training before you retake the test.

You can’t rebook the test if you fail it a third time.

What to take to your test

You must bring:

  • your UK driving licence
  • a suitable car
  • a pupil

You should also bring a log of the training you’ve been doing to qualify as an approved driving instructor (ADI).

Your test will be cancelled and you won’t get your money back if you don’t take the right things with you.

Your driving licence

You need to apply for a replacement driving licence if you lose yours before your test. This could take up to 15 days to arrive. Rearrange your test if you don’t get the new licence in enough time.

Your driving licence

Bring a valid passport and your paper licence, or your trainee driving instructor licence (if you have one)

If you have a licence from Northern Ireland

Bring the Northern Ireland photocard and paper counterpart.

Rules for the car you use

Your car must:

  • be taxed
  • be insured for a driving test (check with your insurance company)
  • be roadworthy and have a current MOT (if it’s over 3 years old)
  • be a saloon, hatchback or estate car in good working condition - you can’t use a convertible
  • have full-size rear seats
  • have no warning lights showing, for example, the airbag warning light
  • have no tyre damage and the legal tread depth on each tyre - you can’t have a space-saver spare tyre fitted
  • be smoke-free - this means you can’t smoke in it just before or during the test
  • be able to reach at least 62mph and have an mph speedometer
  • have 4 wheels and a maximum authorised mass (MAM) of no more than 3,500 kg The MAM is the limit on how much the car can weigh when it’s loaded. It’ll be in the car’s handbook

Your test will be cancelled and you’ll have to pay again if your car doesn’t meet the rules.

Things that must be fitted

The car must have:

  • L-plates (‘L’ or ‘D’ plates in Wales) on the front and rear if your pupil is a learner
  • working rear seat belts
Dashcams and other cameras

You can use a camera fitted for insurance purposes, as long as it:

  • faces outside of the car and doesn’t film the inside
  • doesn’t record audio from inside the car
Hire cars

You can take your test in a hire car if it’s fitted with dual controls and meets all the other rules.

Vehicle features

You can use a car with:

  • an electronic parking brake
  • hill-start assist
Manual and automatic cars

If you have a manual licence, you can take the test in either a manual or automatic car. You’ll be able to train people in both types of car when you’ve qualified. If you have an automatic licence, you must take the test in an automatic car. You’ll only be able to train people in an automatic car when you’ve qualified.

Cars with known safety faults

You can’t use one of the cars shown in the table unless you have proof that it’s safe. This is because these cars have been recalled for a safety reason. You must bring the proof that it’s safe with you when you take your test.

Model Reason for recall Vehicles affected Recall issue date
Citroen C1 Steering failure Vehicles built between 9 Sep 2014 and 15 Oct 2014, with vehicle identification numbers (VINs) between wF7xxxxxxER516105 and VF7xxxxxxER523367 28 Jun 2016
Peugeot 108 Steering failure Vehicles built between 9 Jun 2014 and 15 Oct 2014, with VINsbetween VF3xxxxxxER256527 and F3xxxxxxER017078 28 Jun 2016
Toyota Aygo Steering failure Vehicles built between 9 Jun 2014 and 15 Oct 2014, with VINsbetween JTDJGNEC#0N022080 and 0N026438, JTDJPNEC#0N002099 and 0N002100, JTDKGNEC#0N022186 and 0N031372, and JTDKPNEC#0N002083 and 0N002102 28 Jun 2016
Toyota Yaris Potentially defective seat rail track and/or steering column mounting Some models built between Jun 2005 and May 2010 (‘05’ to ‘10’ registration plates) 9 Apr 2014
Vauxhall ADAM Potential steering problem VINs with last 8 digits between E6077301 to E6113446, and F6000001 to F6006544 29 Sep 2014
Vauxhall Corsa D Potential steering problem VINs with last 8 digits between E6071016 and E6118738, and E4181031 and E4308122 29 Sep 2014
Proof you need to bring to your test

You must bring proof that says one of the following:

  • the car was recalled and the recall work has been done
  • the car was recalled but didn’t need any work to be done
  • the car wasn’t part of the recall

The proof must be either:

  • the recall letter or safety notice, stamped by the manufacturer or dealer
  • on official or headed notepaper from the manufacturer or a dealer

Your test will be cancelled and you could lose your fee if you don’t bring the right proof.

What happens at the standards check

A Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency examiner will watch you give a client-centred driving lesson lasting about an hour to one of your pupils.

The examiner will look for evidence that you meet the national standard for driver and rider training.

Your pupil

Your pupil can be a learner or a full licence holder.

They can’t be an approved driving instructor (ADI) or someone else who is preparing to take the ADI part 3 test.

You can take your trainer or mentor with you, but they can’t take part in the lesson.

What you’ll be marked on

During your ADI part 3 test, your examiner will be looking for evidence that you meet the national standards for driver and rider training.

You’ll be marked on 17 high level areas of competence that are grouped into 3 categories:

  • lesson planning
  • risk management
  • teaching and learning skills

The 17 high level areas of competence are listed in the ADI Part 3 Test Report Form which the examiner will assess during your test. Look at these before you take your ADI part 3 test, so you know what the examiner will be assessing.

Lesson planning

You need to show you can adapt your lesson plan, where appropriate, to help your pupil work towards their learning goals.

You shouldn’t stick to a planned lesson because the needs of your pupil might change throughout the lesson and it’s important you can adapt to that.

Risk management

Another area instructors commonly fail on is not giving pupils enough feedback on any potentially dangerous situations.

As well as providing your pupil with timely and appropriate feedback, it’s important that if they make any serious or dangerous faults they know what they’ve done and why it’s dangerous.

It’s up to you to make sure they understand this, so they don’t make the same mistake again.

At the end of the session the pupil should be encouraged to reflect on their performance and discuss their feelings with the ADI. The ADI should encourage honest self-appraisal and use client-centred techniques to highlight areas that need development if the pupil has not recognised them. Once development areas have been identified the pupil should be encouraged to make them part of future development.

Teaching and learning strategies

You need to be able to show you can teach your pupil in a style that’s suited for them. This means using methods that work best for them. For example, when giving verbal directions, your pupil might find it easier if you referred to left and right as ‘my side’ or ‘your side’.

It’s important you give your pupil appropriate and timely feedback rather than giving it all at the end of the lesson. Having regular discussions throughout the lesson helps your pupil understand what they might have done wrong.

You should encourage your pupil to analyse problems and take responsibility for their own learning. For example, if your pupil forgot to check their blind spot before pulling out, you might:

  • ask them if they know what they did wrong
  • risk management
  • explain why they need to make sure they check their blind spots next time

Your test result

After you give the lesson, the examiner will discuss your performance and give you your result.

You’ll get your grade, along with your completed approved driving instructor (ADI) part 3 test report form.

Total score Grade Description
0-30 Fail Your performance is unsatisfactory, and you won’t join the ADI register
31-42 Grade B You’ll be allowed to join the ADI register
43-51 Grade A You have shown a high standard of instruction and you’ll be allowed to join the ADI register

You’ll automatically fail if:

  • you get a score of 7 or less in the ‘risk management’ category
  • the examiner stops the lesson because you’ve put yourself or someone else in danger
If you pass

You can apply for your first ADI badge if you pass the ADI part 3 test. You must apply within 12 months of passing the test, or you’ll have to pass all 3 qualifying tests again.

If you don’t pass

You can take the test again if you fail the first or second attempt. You must book the next attempt within 2 years of passing your ADI part 1 test.

Failing the third attempt

You have to retake and pass the ADI part 1 test and ADI part 2 test again if you fail the ADI part 3 test at your third attempt.

You must wait 2 years from when you originally passed the ADI part 1 test before you can take it again

Appeal your ADI part 3 test

You can appeal if you think your examiner didn’t follow the regulations when they carried out your test.

Your test result can’t be changed, but you might get a free retest if your appeal is successful.

You have to appeal to a magistrate’s court or sheriff’s court.

You must appeal to a:

  • magistrate’s court within 6 months if you took your test in England or Wales
  • sheriff’s court within 21 days if you took your test in Scotland

If your test is cancelled or there's bad weather

Your approved driving instructor (ADI) part 3 test can be cancelled or stopped because of bad weather, problems with your car, or for other reasons.

Bad weather

Tests aren’t carried out in dangerous weather conditions, such as when the roads are icy or if there’s flooding, thick fog or high winds.

Call your test centre if there are any of these conditions on the day of your test. The phone number for the test centre is on your booking confirmation email.

If your test can’t go ahead

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) will:

  • automatically book the next available date for your test
  • Send you the details within 3 working days - it can take up to 7 days if there’s a long period of bad weather
    You can change the date you’re given if it’s not suitable.
    You can’t claim for any out-of-pocket expenses if your test is cancelled because of bad weather.
Problems with you or your car

You’ll have to book another test and pay again if your test can’t be completed because of a problem with:

  • you, for example, if you feel unwell while taking your test
  • your car, for example, if it breaks down during the test or doesn’t meet the rules to be used
If your test is cancelled for another reason

Sometimes DVSA has to cancel tests for other reasons, for example, if the examiner is unwell.

You’ll be sent a new date for your test if this happens. You can change the date if it’s not suitable.

You can apply for a refund of out-of-pocket expenses if DVSA cancels your test at short notice.